Books

2019 K. Ryan Proctor and Richard E. Niemeyer. Mechanistic Criminology. New York, New York. Routledge (see here for the Intro to Part I)

Book Chapters

2013 Richard E. Niemeyer. "What Are the Neurological Foundations of Identities and Identity-Related Processes?” In the Handbook of Neurosociology, edited by David D. Franks and Jonathan H. Turner: Springer Netherlands.

2009 Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Niemeyer. “The world revolution of 20xx.” In Transnational Political Spaces, edited by Mathias Albert, Gesa Bluhm, Han Helmig, Andreas Leutzsch, Jochen Walter. Campus Verlag: Frankfurt/New York

2009 Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Niemeyer (with others). “Global State formation and global democracy: a world historical perspective” In Hegemonic Transitions, The State and Crisis in Neoliberal Capitalism, edited by Yildiz Atasoy. New York: Routledge

2009 Thomas D. Hall, Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Niemeyer. “The Roles of Central Asian Middlemen and Marcher States in Afroeurasian World-System Synchrony.” In The Rise of Asia and the Transformation of the World-System, edited by Ganesh K. Trichur. Boulder: Paradigm

2008 Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Niemeyer. “Scale Transitions and the Evolution of Global Governance since the Bronze Age” in Systemic Transitions: Past, Present and Future, edited by William R. Thompson. New York: Palgrave/MacMillan

Refereed Articles

2011 Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Niemeyer (with others). "Cycles of Rise and Fall, Upsweeps and Collapses: Changes in the Scale of Settlements and Polities Since the Bronze Age.” History & Mathematics

2010 Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Niemeyer (with others). "Middlemen and marcher states in Central Asia and East/West Empire Synchrony." Social Evolution & History, vol. 9;1. March/April.

2007 Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Niemeyer (with others). The Contours of Solidarity and Division Among Global movements.” International Journal of Peace Studies, vol 12; 2: 1-16 

Current Working Papers in Criminology and Deviance

Working Paper #1: “A Tangential Critical Test of Akers’ Concept of the Matching Function. “

Abstract: In progress.

Working Paper #2: “Memory: An Elaboration of Social Learning Theory.”

Abstract: Social learning theory (Akers, 2009) contends that criminal behavior is ultimately the result of the definitions one learns (i.e., skills, attitudes, neutralizations, and motives) through operant conditioning or imitation that favor criminal behavior over conforming behavior within specific situations.  Unfortunately, social learning theory’s conception of learning relies heavily on behaviorism and has yet to be elaborated with contemporary understandings of learning and memory that have been discovered within cognitive psychology and neuroscience.  Drawing upon mechanistic criminology as a theoretical method, this paper integrates social learning theory with contemporary understandings of learning and memory, articulates the concrete learning mechanisms involved in various forms of nondeclarative and declarative memory, identifies areas where social learning theory is incorrect in its conceptions of learning mechanisms, and updates social learning theory to reflect the mechanisms involved in memory and learning accurately.

Working Paper #3: “Explicating the Neurological Foundations of Neutralization Theory.”

Abstract: In progress.

Working Paper #4: “Expanding Neutralization Theory Using the Neuroscience of Emotion and Emotion Regulation.”

Abstract: In progress.